A Conversation with Kat Brady, Part 2

Running time approx. 32 min

In Part 2, Kat Brady, Coordinator of the Community Alliance on Prisons (CAP), further explains how the community can create a more effective and cost-efficient criminal justice system through Smart Justice policies.  As an example of Smart Justice, CAP introduced Justice Reinvestment to the Hawai’i State Legislature and succeeded in promoting passage of subsequent bills in 2012.  Justice Reinvestment will streamline the criminal justice system process and reallocate existing funds from incarceration to re-entry community programs, including parole and probation work.

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A Conversation with Kat Brady, Part 1

Running time approx. 30 minutes

Kat Brady is the Coordinator of the Community Alliance on Prisons (CAP), an organization that educates the people and lawmakers of Hawai’i about justice issues.  Whether sponsoring conferences or presenting testimony at the State Legislature, CAP advocates for solutions that have been proven and are scientifically sound.  Through educating the community on Smart Justice policies and Smart solutions/alternatives, CAP encourages people to look at the criminal justice system and society holistically.  This comprehensive approach has been proven to be cost-effective in decreasing crime, reducing imprisoned populations, and builds safer communities.

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A Conversation with Toni Bissen, Part 2

Running time approx. 28 minutes

In Part 2 of this two-part interview, Toni further discusses the Pu’a Foundation’s work at the Women’s Community Correctional Center (WCCC), including sponsoring the Prison Monologues, live performances based on the writings of incarcerated women. The all-female prisoner cast of the Prison Monologues performs their own writings at schools, community organizations, universities, and government agencies, sharing true stories about their lives, their fears, their relationships with their families, and their personal transformation.

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A Conversation with Toni Bissen, Part 1

Running time approx. 28 minutes

Toni Bissen is Executive Director of the Pu’a Foundation, a charitable organization that was established in 1996 as a result of the apology, redress, and reconciliation between the Native Hawaiian people and the United Church of Christ (UCC) for the Church’s complicity involved with the 1893 overthrow of the Hawaiian Constitutional Monarchy.  The Foundation’s vision is that through pu’a, the process of feeding, nourishing and strengthening, there will be the emergence of empowered, enlightened communities and society.  Its aspiration is community healing and well-being to reconcile the past with the present, so that as a Hawai’i community, together we can build a better future.

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A Conversation with Dr. RaeDeen Keahiolalo-Karasuda

Running time approx. 38 minutes

RaeDeen Keahiolalo-Karasuda, the Director of the Office of Native Hawaiian Partnerships at Chaminade University, received her PhD in political science from the University of Hawai’i at Manoa.  Her dissertation, “The Colonial Carceral and Prison Politics in Hawai’i,” analyzes the historical and contemporary ways that policy, representation, and discourse perpetuate and enable the criminalization and over-incarceration of Hawaiians.  Her professional background spans a range of disciplines, including law and policy, research, and community education.  RaeDeen’s passion to contribute toward the well-being of Hawaiians drives her commitments in both her professional and community work.

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A Conversation with Dr. Lynette Hi’ilani Cruz, Part 2

Running time approx. 28 minutes

In Part 2, we begin with a five-minute clip of Dr. Lynette Cruz discussing the pedagogical value of student field trips, a teaching method raised in Part 1.  What is most striking about Dr. Cruz is her thoughtful approach to life and to politics.  Her social justice work centers on understanding people’s relationship to the land and relationship to each other as key to finding solutions to the larger issues.

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A Conversation with Dr. Lynette Hi’ilani Cruz, Part 1

Running time approx. 28 minutes

Lynette Hi’ilani Cruz, a retired professor of anthropology at Hawai’i Pacific University (HPU), is a long-time community organizer and strong advocate for Hawaiian independence.  Whether working on issues of homelessness, respecting the land, sustainability, or Hawaiian sovereignty, Lynette educates by integrating an awareness of the land (‘aina) with knowledge of the history and of the national and cultural identity of that place/site.

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A Conversation with Dexter Keeaumoku Kaiama

Running time approx. 36 minutes

Dexter Keeaumoku Kaiama is a practicing Hawaiian attorney in Honolulu who credits his wife, Manu Kaiama (a prominent activist, instructor at the University of Hawaii-Manoa, and accountant), for raising his political consciousness by taking him to the island of Kahoolawe (site of political struggle).  Keeaumoku lends his legal expertise to the political movement demanding that the United States deoccupy the islands so that the restoration of the Hawaiian Kingdom can occur.

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A Conversation with Dr. Noelani Goodyear-Ka’opua

Running time approximately 36 minutes

Noelani Goodyear-Ka’opua, an assistant professor of political science at University of Hawai’i-Manoa, is a staunch supporter of Hawaiian independence and “aloha ‘aina” (love for the land). In this interview, Noelani discusses how her familial experiences and the islands political history have grounded and shaped her work as a scholar and teacher. Her course offerings, which span from introductory politics of Hawaii to subjects such as “Contemporary Native Hawaiian Politics” and “Decolonial Futures,” reflect this perspective.

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A Conversation with Walter Ritte

Running time: approximately 37 minutes

Community leader Walter Ritte, who lives off the land as a homesteader and deer hunter on the island of Moloka’i, is a longtime advocate for protecting the land and for Hawaiian rights.  As a member of Hui Alaloa, Ritte helped organize protest marches to restore the Hawaiian Kingdom’s access rights from the state of Hawai’i so that traditional hunting and fishing practices could continue.  Ritte also helped lead the 1970s community organization Protect Kaho’olawe Ohana (PKO), in which he served as one of the original “Kaho’olawe Nine” (Hawaiian activists who landed on the sacred island of Kaho’olawe in 1976 to protest its bombing by the U.S. military.).

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